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Fort Thompson woman pleads guilty to federal meth charge

A Fort Thompson woman pleaded guilty Tuesday in federal district court to conspiring to distribute methamphetamine. Following the court's order for a presentence report to be completed, Brooke Shields will be sentenced on May 13. On Nov. 14, Shie...

A Fort Thompson woman pleaded guilty Tuesday in federal district court to conspiring to distribute methamphetamine.

Following the court's order for a presentence report to be completed, Brooke Shields will be sentenced on May 13.

On Nov. 14, Shields, Benjamin Big Eagle and Franki Zephier were each indicted on one count of conspiracy to distribute at least 500 grams of a substance containing methamphetamine. There have been no further court proceedings in the cases of Big Eagle and Zephier.

Court documents indicate that Shields' role in the offenses that occurred between Jan. 1, 2017, and the day she was indicted involved more than 1.5 kg but less than 5 kg (or between 3.3 and 11 pounds) of methamphetamine.

Conspiracy to distribute a controlled substance carries a mandatory minimum sentence of 10 years and a maximum of life in federal prison and/or a $10 million fine.

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However, Shields' plea agreement states that she is entitled to a two-level decrease in offense level as long as she meets certain requirements leading up to sentencing. At the sentencing hearing, both the U.S. and Shields will be able to argue for whatever sentence they think is appropriate within legal limits.

According to the plea agreement, Shields will have to pay a $1,000 fine and a $100 special assessment.

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