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Former South Dakota deputy reunited with badge stolen in '65

SIOUX FALLS (AP) -- A former South Dakota lawman has his badge back more than 50 years after it was stolen. Gene Abdallah was a Minnehaha County deputy in 1965 when a teenager swiped his badge. On Thursday, Duke Tufty, now a 69-year-old minister ...

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SIOUX FALLS (AP) - A former South Dakota lawman has his badge back more than 50 years after it was stolen.

Gene Abdallah was a Minnehaha County deputy in 1965 when a teenager swiped his badge.

On Thursday, Duke Tufty, now a 69-year-old minister in Kansas City, Missouri, returned the badge to the 82-year-old Abdallah.

The Argus Leader reports Abdallah had apprehended Tufty and another 16-year-old for underage drinking and driving and was taking them to jail when the deputy stopped for coffee. Tufty says he took the badge from Abdallah's jacket and put it in his shoe.

Tufty says he was "pretty ashamed" of what he had done.

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Abdallah went on to a career as U.S. marshal, Highway Patrol superintendent and South Dakota lawmaker. He says getting his badge back was "absolutely a thrill."

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