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Felonies dismissed for man once acquitted of murder, admits to having marijuana

A Mitchell man acquitted of murder pleaded guilty to possessing marijuana as felony charges were dismissed. Donald McDougal, 51, of Mitchell, was sentenced to 30 days in jail, all suspended, after pleading guilty to possession of marijuana earlie...

The Davison County Public Safety Center serves as the home for county lockup. (Matt Gade/Republic)
The Davison County Public Safety Center serves as the home for county lockup. (Matt Gade/Republic)

A Mitchell man acquitted of murder pleaded guilty to possessing marijuana as felony charges were dismissed.

Donald McDougal, 51, of Mitchell, was sentenced to 30 days in jail, all suspended, after pleading guilty to possession of marijuana earlier this month, court documents state.

McDougal was initially charged with possession and ingestion of methamphetamine, causing intentional damage to property and possession of drug paraphernalia after a Jan. 30, 2016, incident in which he was accused of using drugs and trying to pry open the door to a Minnesota Street apartment in Mitchell.

The other charges were dismissed, and McDougal was ordered to pay $911 in fines, restitution and court costs.

In November 2015, McDougal was acquitted of murder in the death of his wife, Janie McDougal, but he recently pleaded guilty to grand theft and simple assault after stealing silver, initially valued at $1,800, in May in Hartford and then assaulting someone in June.

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McDougal was sentenced to two years in prison and one year in jail, all suspended, in October for the Minnehaha County charges.

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