ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

DWU's Dr. Seuss Carnival to return for 18th year

The Dakota Wesleyan University Future Teachers' Organization will host its 18th annual Dr. Seuss Carnival from 10 a.m. to noon on March 5 in the L.B. Williams Commons Area.

The Dakota Wesleyan University Future Teachers' Organization will host its 18th annual Dr. Seuss Carnival from 10 a.m. to noon on March 5 in the L.B. Williams Commons Area.

A few new things this year will be a photo booth with Dr. Seuss accessories to pose with, several new games and Dr. Seuss reading stations.

"This event is mutually beneficial to the Mitchell community as well as the Dakota Wesleyan students who put it on," said René Pruitt, associate professor of education. "Our education students are hard at work fundraising for the event and planning activities and generally each year we have non-education students volunteering to help, as well."

Children from preschool through fifth grade are welcome to participate, and adults must accompany their children to the carnival. Children will have a chance to play several types of games and receive prizes, read different books, be read to by DWU students, and each child who participates in the festivities will receive a free book. Adults might like to bring a camera, because the Cat in the Hat and Thing 1 and Thing 2 will make the rounds and pose for photos.

"Each carnival provides exciting fun for area children while at the same time allows the DWU students an opportunity to serve their community," Pruitt said. "In addition, the teacher candidates and other DWU students receive valuable experience in hosting a large event and managing hundreds of elementary children in just a few hours. That is real-world experience in a really fun atmosphere."

Related Topics: DAKOTA WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY
What To Read Next
Members Only
“In our industry there aren’t a lot of young people in it. I like the fact that there are a lot of young people in agriculture here,” he said of the Mitchell area.
Members Only
After the departure of longtime superintendent Marje Kaiser and the hiring of Dan Trefz, who recently resigned, advocates say the specialty school needs help from lawmakers to reach its past heights.
Over the past year, the city has been mulling over bringing a secondary water source to Mitchell – a move Mayor Bob Everson said is aimed at positioning the city to grow.
At issue was the attendance at a legislative conference in Hawaii last December by Spencer Gosch and Jamie Smith.