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Dakota Wesleyan's Great Wesleyan Giveback set for Tuesday

More than 130 years ago today, Dakota Wesleyan University signed its articles of incorporation, setting the ground for what it is today. As a thank you to the community that has supported the school over the years, DWU created a day of service in...

More than 130 years ago today, Dakota Wesleyan University signed its articles of incorporation, setting the ground for what it is today. As a thank you to the community that has supported the school over the years, DWU created a day of service in 2010 to commemorate its quasquicentennial.

Rain or shine, DWU's Great Wesleyan Giveback will once again take place on Tuesday, May 3, across the city of Mitchell.

This is the seventh year that Dakota Wesleyan has organized the Great Wesleyan Giveback - known previously as Service Day - a morning when the entire campus comes together to perform service projects on campus and around the entire community. About 550 participants are signed up for the day.

About 1,300 man hours are projected to be spent in town on Tuesday, with project sites at: First United Methodist Church, Dakota Discovery Museum, Hitchcock Park, Cadwell Park, Life Quest, Mitchell Weekend Snack Pack program, the Pepsi-Cola Soccer Complex, YWCA and Mitchell Area Safehouse. Volunteers will also pick up trash along Dry Run Creek, on Spruce Street and Cabela Road, around Lake Mitchell and on the bike trail.

Students in the Arlene Gates Department of Nursing will split up into teams and work at Wesley Acres and Assisted Living Home and Rehab in Mitchell, and 24 DWU students and staff took residents from assisted living to the circus at the Corn Palace as part of their volunteering. The education department will also send groups to each three of the elementary schools, Mitchell Middle School and Mitchell High School.

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Following the volunteer projects, everyone will reconvene in the cafeteria for an indoor picnic.

Related Topics: DAKOTA WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY
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