ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Council moves to correct carbon monoxide problem

The Mitchell City Council moved Monday evening at City Hall to correct air-handling problems in the Public Safety Building that caused three people to require medical treatment after coming into contact with carbon monoxide.

The Mitchell City Council moved Monday evening at City Hall to correct air-handling problems in the Public Safety Building that caused three people to require medical treatment after coming into contact with carbon monoxide.

The council approved the first reading of a $15,000 budget supplement requested by Public Safety Chief Lyndon Overweg to replace a boiler system in the building. He expects to request an additional $120,000 at some future time to replace heating and cooling units on the building's roof.

Overweg said the problem is one of "negative pressure."

"What happened the other day is it started pulling air out of the chimney from the boiler system and from the boiler itself, and then it pulls it through the building," Overweg told the council. He said the problem dates back years to a previous council decision to cut costs from the installation of the system.

"It was scaled back and this is a cheaper version," Overweg said. "We're supposed to have a version that continuously introduces air into that building 24 hours a day, seven days a week, if you're open 24-7. Right now it does not do that."

ADVERTISEMENT

No mention was made during the meeting of the carbon monoxide's effect on people in the building. Afterward, The Daily Republic questioned Overweg, who said three people were affected and required medical treatment.

Some council members publicly criticized their predecessors for the cost-cutting measures that allegedly caused the problem.

"This is what happens when you cut corners," said Councilman Travis Carpenter.

What To Read Next
Members Only
“In our industry there aren’t a lot of young people in it. I like the fact that there are a lot of young people in agriculture here,” he said of the Mitchell area.
Members Only
After the departure of longtime superintendent Marje Kaiser and the hiring of Dan Trefz, who recently resigned, advocates say the specialty school needs help from lawmakers to reach its past heights.
Over the past year, the city has been mulling over bringing a secondary water source to Mitchell – a move Mayor Bob Everson said is aimed at positioning the city to grow.
At issue was the attendance at a legislative conference in Hawaii last December by Spencer Gosch and Jamie Smith.