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Civil War veteran honored with headstone

After 114 years, a Civil War veteran finally recieved a proper headstone. On Friday, Civil War veteran James M. Parker received a permanent headstone at his gravesite in Graceland Cemetery in Mitchell, where he was originally buried on Aug. 13, 1902.

Rev. Suzanne Burris, right, gives a brief history of Civil War Veteran James M. Parker to a small crowd who came to the ceremony Friday while 1st Sgt. Dean Weiss holds a United States flag to honor Parker in Graceland Cemetery in Mitchell. The ceremony was to honor Parker by giving him a proper headstone at his grave site. (Sarah Barclay/Republic)
Rev. Suzanne Burris, right, gives a brief history of Civil War Veteran James M. Parker to a small crowd who came to the ceremony Friday while 1st Sgt. Dean Weiss holds a United States flag to honor Parker in Graceland Cemetery in Mitchell. The ceremony was to honor Parker by giving him a proper headstone at his grave site. (Sarah Barclay/Republic)

After 114 years, a Civil War veteran finally recieved a proper headstone.

On Friday, Civil War veteran James M. Parker received a permanent headstone at his gravesite in Graceland Cemetery in Mitchell, where he was originally buried on Aug. 13, 1902. Parker is listed in records as a former teacher and once a prisoner of war.

Along with the monument, Parker was given the military honor of a gun salute, the playing of "Taps" and the the folding of the United States flag by the American Legion Post 18 and Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 2750.

Rev. Suzanne Burris, of the Congregational United Church of Christ, also spoke at the beginning of the ceremony to the small crowd that gathered to honor the soldier.

The Davison County Veteran's Service Office organized the effort to get Parker a headstone. Because no family for Parker could be found, the U.S. flag was instead presented to Veterans Service Officer Jessica Davison.

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