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City declares public health warning at Lake Mitchell, swimming discouraged

Mitchell Parks and Recreation performs sampling of Sandy Beach, Public Beach, Campground swimming areas and other parts of the lake for various bacteria on a weekly basis over the course of the summer.

Lake Mitchell warning.jpg
A harmful algae warning issued at Lake Mitchell is shown in 2017. (Republic file photo)

Lake Mitchell is once again at a warning level advisory due the high presence of harmful algal blooms, the city announced Thursday afternoon.

Activities such as swimming, wading or water skiing are discouraged by the city. People and pets should be cautious around the lake and take action to avoid any contact with the water.

Public health warnings are issued when microcystin toxin concentrations reach 20 parts per billion or chlorophyll concentrations reach 50 parts per billion.

Mitchell Parks and Recreation performs sampling of Sandy Beach, Public Beach, Campground swimming areas and other parts of the lake for various bacteria on a weekly basis over the course of the summer.

The most recent warning level advisory was issued on Sept. 21, 2020. It marks the fifth consecutive year that Lake Mitchell has moved into warning status at some point during the period from June to September, and is the third time in that span that the warning status has been reached in the final 10 days of June and first 10 days of July.

Related Topics: LAKE MITCHELL
A South Dakota native, Hunter joined Forum Communications Company as a reporter for the Mitchell (S.D.) Republic in June 2021 and now works as a digital reporter for Forum News Service, focusing on local news in Sioux Falls. He also writes regional news spanning across the Dakotas, Minnesota and Wisconsin.
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