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Burg announces his bid for state Senate in District 20

Quinten Burg, a Democrat from Wessington Springs, has announced his candidacy for the state Senate in District 20, which consists of Aurora, Davison and Jerauld counties.

Quinten Burg, a Democrat from Wessington Springs, has announced his candidacy for the state Senate in District 20, which consists of Aurora, Davison and Jerauld counties.

Burg, 63, is a former District 22 legislator. The recent reorganization of legislative districts in South Dakota moved him into the new District 20.

"I want to continue to influence the future of our state," he said in a news release. "That's why I'm running for the state Senate. I've tried in the past to bring common sense ideas to Pierre that will help South Dakota over the long run."

As a lifelong resident of Jerauld County, Burg has farmed and ranched east of Wessington Springs. He is part of the Firesteel Ranch Corporation with his brother Jim Burg and nephews Cory Burg and Jeff Burg.

He attended South Dakota State University for two years and served in the South Dakota National Guard. He serves on the board of a multi-county Community Counseling Services agency and is a director on the Wessington Springs Area Community Development board.

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Burg served 10 years in the South Dakota House of Representatives, 1999-2004 and 2007-2010. He was a member of the House Appropriations Committee, the Executive Board of the Legislature, and is a former House assistant minority leader. He and his wife Linda live on the family farm near Wessington Springs. She is a retired SDSU Extension educator.

Burg will face incumbent state Sen. Mike Vehle, R-Mitchell, in the Nov. 6 general election. Vehle defeated Steve Sibson, also of Mitchell, in the June 5 Republican primary.

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