ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Black Hills St. can start planning an online special-ed master's degree

VERMILLION--Black Hills State University received approval Wednesday to start planning a master of arts in teaching degree for special education. The South Dakota Board of Regents gave the green light during a meeting at the University of South D...

VERMILLION-Black Hills State University received approval Wednesday to start planning a master of arts in teaching degree for special education. The South Dakota Board of Regents gave the green light during a meeting at the University of South Dakota in Vermillion.

Courses would be offered online and cover two years including one semester of student teaching. The program would start this fall if approved.

The application from BHSU President Tom Jackson cited federal statistics indicating shortages of special education teachers in 49 states including South Dakota. Associated School Boards of South Dakota data showed 60 percent of school districts in the state had unfilled special-education positions in the past three years.

BHSU would enroll 12 students annually. The Spearfish campus has tuition reciprocity with Wyoming. USD has a special education master of arts degree that has a broader scope.

Other universities in the region with master-level programs in special education are: Minnesota State University Moorhead, University of Minnesota in Minneapolis-St. Paul, St. Cloud State University, University of North Dakota at Grand Forks, and Minot State University, Montana State University at Bozeman and University of Wyoming at Laramie.

Related Topics: EDUCATION
What To Read Next
“This is sensationalism at its finest, and it does not deserve to be heard in our state capitol,” Rep. Erin Healy, a Democrat and one of 10 votes against the bill in the 70-person chamber, said.
Members Only
Prior to be sentenced to prison, a Mitchell man blamed the winter weather and slick roads for his DUI charge and said he wouldn't have been pulled over had it not been for the "crazy weather."
Proponents say legislation would prevent land damage; opponents say it would disadvantage non-landowners
Month saw sixth highest overall snowfall of any month