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Attorneys for Bosworth, medical board argue over license

SIOUX FALLS (AP) -- Former Republican U.S. Senate candidate Annette Bosworth's felony conviction for violating election law doesn't prevent her from providing proper care to her patients, her attorney told a judge weighing whether the Sioux Falls...

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SIOUX FALLS (AP) - Former Republican U.S. Senate candidate Annette Bosworth's felony conviction for violating election law doesn't prevent her from providing proper care to her patients, her attorney told a judge weighing whether the Sioux Falls doctor should be allowed to keep her medical license.

The attorney for the state medical board, though, said Bosworth's honesty and not her medical competency are in question.

The South Dakota Board of Medical and Osteopathic Examiners last September revoked Bosworth's medical license, and she appealed. Judge Doug Hoffman held a hearing Monday and will rule later, the Argus Leader reported. Bosworth can continue practicing medicine while her case proceeds.

A jury last May convicted Bosworth of perjury and filing false documents in connection with her nominating petitions for the 2014 Republican primary election, in which she finished fourth out of five candidates. She cited inexperience for the mishandling of the petitions, which had signatures she attested to witnessing despite being out of the country at the time. She received a suspended sentence and community service.

Bosworth's attorney, Paul Richardson, said Monday that the criminal case shouldn't affect her ability to continuing practicing internal medicine, adding that the medical board "found that she adequately treated her patients."

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Medical board attorney Craig Kennedy said Bosworth's conviction raises questions about her character.

"A person who will lie to the extent of felonious perjury simply cannot be trusted," he said.

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