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Attorney general explains referred youth minimum wage law

PIERRE, S.D. (AP) -- Attorney General Marty Jackley has released an explanation for a law referred to voters that would carve out a $7.50 youth minimum wage.

PIERRE, S.D. (AP) - Attorney General Marty Jackley has released an explanation for a law referred to voters that would carve out a $7.50 youth minimum wage.

Jackley's office said Thursday the measure would not become law unless approved by a majority vote in the 2016 election.

The law was passed during the 2015 session. It would apply to non-tipped workers under 18.

Since opponents were successful in gathering enough support to put the measure on the ballot, it didn't go into effect as intended on July 1, 2015.

Opponents of the youth minimum wage law have argued that it is an affront to voters who overwhelmingly passed an $8.50 minimum wage in the 2014 election.

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The wage bumped up to $8.55 in January because of a cost-of-living increase built into the law.

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