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Alpena woman injured after crashing into train

ALPENA -- An Alpena woman sustained minor injuries Monday after crashing a vehicle into a train north of Alpena. Jodi Kobold, 31, was injured Monday after the 2015 Jeep Grand Cherokee she was driving crashed into a stopped train near the intersec...

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ALPENA - An Alpena woman sustained minor injuries Monday after crashing a vehicle into a train north of Alpena.

Jodi Kobold, 31, was injured Monday after the 2015 Jeep Grand Cherokee she was driving crashed into a stopped train near the intersection of 392nd Avenue and 220th Street, approximately one mile north of Alpena, according to the South Dakota Department of Public Safety.

Authorities said Kobold was traveling northbound on 392nd Avenue at approximately 6:50 a.m., but she was unable to see the train parked on the road due to foggy conditions.

Kobold was wearing a seat belt, but she sustained minor injuries. She was transported to the Huron Regional Medical Center by Jerauld County Ambulance. No one on the train was injured.

The vehicle sustained extensive damage to its front end, but there did not appear to be any significant damage to the train. It was unknown why the train was stopped on the road.

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No charges are pending, and the South Dakota Highway Patrol investigated the incident. The Alpena Fire Department and sheriff's offices from Jerauld and Sanborn counties also responded to the scene.

Related Topics: CRASHES
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