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ACT manager steps down; board hopes to fill position by April

Ever wanted to manage a community theater? Now's your chance. On Sunday, Megan Reimnitz, managing director of the Mitchell Area Community Theatre, will be stepping down and "transitioning away from the theater," according to Tim Goldammer, the pr...

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Ever wanted to manage a community theater? Now's your chance.

On Sunday, Megan Reimnitz, managing director of the Mitchell Area Community Theatre, will be stepping down and "transitioning away from the theater," according to Tim Goldammer, the president of the ACT Board of Directors.

But while the board is happy for Reimnitz - who has been with the theater since June 2014 - members are sad to see her go as it leaves an important position at the ACT open.

"She's been a great asset to the theater," Goldammer said. "We've really had a history of great employees and Megan falls very much into that category of people who really strive to provide Mitchell with great community theater. She was always pushing us to do a better program and trying to figure out different ways to innovate a better program for Mitchell."

Applications are open for the position, which is now going to be called theater office manager rather than managing director, Goldammer said. There three candidates have applied, and Goldammer said the board will begin interviewing candidates next week to hopefully make a decision within the month. Following that, Goldammer said the goal, which is flexible with the successful candidate's needs, is to have the new manager working by the beginning of April.

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Meanwhile, the lobby to the Pepsi-Cola Theatre may have to be closed while the board works to find a replacement for Reimnitz, Goldammer said. While in the transition process, several board members will help out with day-to-day operations.

"Several board members are stepping up in the interim to come in and check answering machines, check different emails and stuff along those lines to make sure our customers are not affected by this, and we're still putting on great theater for next season and going forward," Goldammer said.

Goldammer said when choosing the next manager, the board will look for someone with self motivation as the successful candidate will be spending a lot of time alone in the theater office. The board will also expect candidates to have good customer service, bookkeeping and marketing skills.

As the board searches for Reimnitz's successor, Goldammer said ACT will continue to provide the community with the best theater, especially with the comedy drama showing this weekend. "The Cemetery Club," which follows the lives of three widows, will show at 7:30 p.m. Saturday with a 2 p.m. showing on Sunday at the Pepsi-Cola Theatre. The next, and final, production of the ACT's 2016-17 line-up will be "The Last Five Years," beginning on April 28.

But what's more exciting is the announcement of next year's series, Goldammer said, which has already garnered attention with well-known productions "Mary Poppins" and "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow." Goldammer was unsure of the number, but said the amount of people purchasing season tickets for next year is already high.

But Goldammer said the next few months will also be exciting for the theater. While he couldn't give out specific names due to contracts, Goldammer said a "big name artist" will be coming in May to the theater, along with several other concerts and productions for the community to expect.

"We have some great productions," he said. "And we're on board to have great shows and great programming with the community theater."

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