ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

$40M theme park proposed for Deadwood gets warm reception

DEADWOOD (AP) -- Backers of a proposed $40 million western theme park in Deadwood are lauding the project as a significant economic development opportunity for the Black Hills tourist town.

DEADWOOD (AP) - Backers of a proposed $40 million western theme park in Deadwood are lauding the project as a significant economic development opportunity for the Black Hills tourist town.

Organizers hope the attraction could open in 2019, and early plans for the "Gold Nugget Theme Park" have it located near The Lodge at Deadwood or on land in Whitewood Canyon, the Rapid City Journal reported.

Mayor Chuck Turbiville said the project would expand attractions in the town and could help bring in more families. Large projects help create jobs and increase property and sales tax collections, he said.

"This could be a major game-changer for not only Deadwood, but for the entire northern Hills," Turbiville said.

Deadwood Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Lee Harstad said the proposal would be among the largest private projects built in Deadwood since legalized gambling came to town in 1989.

ADVERTISEMENT

The team proposing the park has a background in the oil and gas industry, the Air Force and business. Realtor Todd Fierro, who is working with the management team, said members had looked at several sites near Deadwood and enlisted the help of a theme park consulting company.

"We're smart enough to know we need the people behind us who know what they are doing, who know the theme park business," Fierro said. "They would run it for the first five years to ensure it gets a good start."

If things go well, a groundbreaking in 2017 would allow the park to open to visitors in 2019, Fierro said.

What To Read Next
Members Only
“In our industry there aren’t a lot of young people in it. I like the fact that there are a lot of young people in agriculture here,” he said of the Mitchell area.
Members Only
After the departure of longtime superintendent Marje Kaiser and the hiring of Dan Trefz, who recently resigned, advocates say the specialty school needs help from lawmakers to reach its past heights.
Over the past year, the city has been mulling over bringing a secondary water source to Mitchell – a move Mayor Bob Everson said is aimed at positioning the city to grow.
At issue was the attendance at a legislative conference in Hawaii last December by Spencer Gosch and Jamie Smith.