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2 indicted in death of woman on Pine Ridge Reservation

RAPID CITY (AP) -- A federal grand jury has indicted a man and a woman from Pine Ridge in the death of a woman on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. Elizabeth LeBeau, 23, is charged with first-degree murder, and Fred Quiver, 29, is charged with b...

RAPID CITY (AP) - A federal grand jury has indicted a man and a woman from Pine Ridge in the death of a woman on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation.

Elizabeth LeBeau, 23, is charged with first-degree murder, and Fred Quiver, 29, is charged with being an accessory. Quiver also goes by the name Fred Brings Plenty, according to U.S. Attorney Randolph Seiler.

The relationship between LeBeau and Quiver isn't clear. It's also not clear how they knew Emily Blue Bird, 24. FBI spokesman Kyle Loven referred questions about the case to the U.S. attorney's office in South Dakota. Office spokeswoman Ace Crawford declined comment, citing the ongoing investigation.

Blue Bird's body was found Jan. 21 in a creek near Pine Ridge. The mother of two had been missing for nearly three weeks. She had been strangled sometime in the first three days of January, Seiler said.

LeBeau and Quiver are in custody in Pine Ridge. Neil Fulton, federal public defender for the Dakotas, on Thursday said he was not able to comment on their behalf because he's out of the office and not yet informed about the case.

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More than 200 family and community members marched from the Sioux Funeral Home to Billy Mills Hall in Pine Ridge on Wednesday to call for an end to violence against women and justice for Blue Bird, KOTA-TV reported. Blue Bird's funeral will be held in the hall on Friday afternoon.

"As of today we're going to remember her as a beautiful angel that is in heaven," said Arnie Hornbeck, a cousin to Blue Bird. "We are following Emily, taking her home today, where we're thinking about her, but she left in a very tragic way."

Drug and alcohol abuse and violence against women are problems on the reservation, said Eileen Janis, who helped organize the march.

"We want the people to stand up and say, 'No more. I don't want to see it anymore,'" she said.

Related Topics: CRIME
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