John Wheeler

John Wheeler

Meteorologist

John Wheeler is Chief Meteorologist for WDAY, a position he has had since May of 1985. Wheeler grew up in the South, in Louisiana and Alabama, and cites his family's move to the Midwest as important to developing his fascination with weather and climate. Wheeler lived in Wisconsin and Iowa as a teenager. He attended Iowa State University and achieved a B.S. degree in Meteorology in 1984. Wheeler worked about a year at WOI-TV in central Iowa before moving to Fargo and WDAY..

Wheeler covers weather for WDAY TV and radio, as well as for The Forum and for inforum.com. Most meteorologists find stormy and extreme weather fascinating and Wheeler is no exception, but his biggest interest is severe winter weather.

Nature's beauty from a weather perspective.
StormTRACKER Meteorologist John Wheeler looks at a cold weather pattern developing
Most of the sunniest locations in the United States are in the Southwest.
When Arctic air is driven southward, its frigidity is usually tempered by conditions along the way.
Corporations such as Google and Meta, which maintain systems based on extremely precise timekeeping, have asked for the suspension.
By the 1880s, trains had developed the technology to travel from town to town fast enough to make the constant resetting of the clock ridiculous.
Lake-effect snow happens when cold air blows across a long fetch of open water that is much warmer.
Road frost can be as dangerous as a coating of freezing drizzle.
Snow-related car accidents are most common when it snows only a little.
Snow often melts away from the sidewalks, streets, and roads in weather that is significantly colder than the melting point of water.