CHAMBERLAIN — The South Dakota Hall of Fame has announced its class of 2021, with 10 inductees set to be honored in April 2022.

The inductees are Gary Cammack (agriculture), Jon Crane (art), Ray Hillenbrand (philanthropic), David Kapaska (professional), Angela Kennecke (professional), Dan Kirby (professional), Steven Lindquist (professional), Ryan McFarland (professional), Marian Sullivan (professional) and Craig Tieszen (professional).

The class of 2021 will be recognized during an in-person Honors Ceremony on April 1-2, 2022 in Chamberlain and Oacoma. Due to its postponement because of the pandemic, the class of 2020 will be enshrined during an in-person Honors Ceremony Sept. 10-11, 2021.

Here's a list of the inductees and their notable accomplishments:

Gary Cammack
Gary Cammack

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Gary Cammack, Union Center: Cammack served two years in the state House of Representatives and currently serves as Majority Leader of the state Senate. He and his wife, Amy, grew their 320-acre ranch into 11,000 acres of living environmental stewardship. His land practices have been lauded by state-wide conservation organizations. Recognizing a need for equipment and supplies, he started a successful agribusiness during a difficult economic time in the late 1970s. Gary has been an influential force for positive change to benefit youth and community, resulting in a new elementary school, community center, church, firehouse and cemetery. He hosts leadership classes to demonstrate first-hand rural community empowerment and personal impact.

Jon Crane
Jon Crane

Jon Crane, Hill City: Crane’s art is known for a subtle and realistic treatment of subjects from rural America in transparent watercolor. Using a dry brush technique, he captures nostalgic landscapes with exquisite detail. Claiming the trademark of "Art That Takes You Home," Jon's paintings evoke emotions of familiarity and belonging. He is adept at finding old farms and homesteads that evoke a sense of the simpler life, telling through his nostalgic watercolors the story of rural America. Crane lives in the Black Hills with Gail, his wife near a secluded trout stream. His highest award was presented in 2015 when he received the South Dakota Governor’s Award for Distinction in Creative Achievement.

Ray Hillenbrand
Ray Hillenbrand

Ray Hillenbrand, Rapid City: "Every community has an angel" and for the Rapid City community, that angel was Ray Hillenbrand. It started with his store Prairie Edge, showcasing the beauty of local Native American culture, then moved on to Hillenbrand being a part of the Governors REDI Fund for Economic Development. Hillenbrand, who died in 2019, was integral in researching, funding, and developing Main Street Square, the development of Legacy Commons playground, and the rebuilding of Memorial Park and the Sixth Street Promenade joining downtown to the Civic Center.

David Kapaska
David Kapaska

David Kapaska, Sioux City, Iowa: After a successful military career, and family medicine practice, David Kapasca became the senior vice president for Medical Affairs at Avera McKennan Hospital and University Health Center, a position he held for almost a decade before retirement. Kapaska has impacted healthcare statewide with his innovative push and adoption of Avera eICU, now Avera eCARE ICU, which was among the early telemedicine offerings and now is the world’s most robust and extensive telemedicine network serving rural health care. He also facilitated the development of the state’s only transitional care unit at Avera Prince of Peace and the Avera eCARE School Health program. He has served on numerous nonprofit boards and is an avid volunteer.

Angela Kennecke
Angela Kennecke

Angela Kennecke, Sioux Falls: An award-winning investigative reporter and broadcast journalist, Kennecke has spent three decades keeping people informed on the evening news. Her investigative reports led to changes in state laws. In recent years, many of Angela’s stories focused on the growing opioid crisis. On the day her 21-year-old daughter, Emily, died of an overdose, Angela was working on a story on Good Samaritan laws and overdose deaths. Kennecke has taken Emily’s story nationwide and internationally. She speaks tirelessly about the issues surrounding opioid addiction, a parent’s frustration, and a sense of helplessness and tells it all from the perspective of a mother who has lost her child. Angela started a charity called “Emily’s Hope,” because she wants to offer hope to other families struggling with addiction.

Dan Kirby
Dan Kirby

Dan Kirby, Sioux Falls: Kirby has been one of the state’s most successful businessmen, leaders, and philanthropists. His career success has been admirable, but the work he has done through public service and philanthropy has been truly remarkable, sending ripples throughout his city, state, and nation. Perhaps his most significant, singular accomplishment was leading the team that made the dream of a Washington Pavilion a reality. The Washington Pavilion has made Sioux Falls a better, richer place to live for people from all walks of life and all ages and the strong support for the arts has also emboldened other South Dakota communities to make the arts a priority.

Steven Lindquist
Steven Lindquist

Steven Lindquist, Beresford: Lindquist has devoted his career to helping others. He was appointed Administrator of the South Dakota Human Services Center in the wake of a crisis at that facility. At that time, he was the youngest administrator in that facility's 100-plus year history. He led the design and construction of the George S. Mickelson Center for the Neurosciences and served as Director of Mental Health for the state of South Dakota, making him one of only two people to have that dual role. As the executive leader of Avera Behavioral Health, he expanded treatment programs and led the design and construction of the Avera Behavioral Health Center, which has served more than 100,000 outpatients.

Ryan McFarland
Ryan McFarland

Ryan McFarland, Rapid City: McFarland is an entrepreneur with a passion for mountain biking and motorsports. His mechanical inclination, and early exposure to entrepreneurship led him to invent two award-winning U.S. Patents. Innovations continued when Ryan’s first son, Bode, was just two years old. Ryan was eager to have his son join him in adventure sports and the great outdoors. The original bike built for his son evolved through numerous prototypes and was ultimately issued a U.S. patent. Strider Sports International was born in 2007 with its global headquarters located in Rapid City. McFarland’s company has evolved from his backyard garage in South Dakota to 75-plus countries worldwide and sales of 16 million in 2019.

Marian Sullivan
Marian Sullivan

Marian Sullivan, Sioux Falls: Sullivan learned at an early age the value of hard work, dedication to a goal, and a lifestyle of giving back. After graduating from college, she met and married her life-long partner, Bill. Together they started the Sullivan Import Company (now Sullivans). After the passing of her husband, Marian carried on and the company continued to grow as a viable business in the gift industry. In 1994, Sullivans moved from two warehouses to a 137,000 square foot state-of-the-art complex. Marian received many awards and accolades for her business prowess and philanthropy. She has shared her life philosophy, business expertise, and generosity with her home state of South Dakota.

Craig Tieszen
Craig Tieszen

Craig Tieszen, Rapid City: Tieszen, who died in 2017, led a dedicated career as a police chief and legislator with honesty, kindness, and integrity. As a leader, he was analytical, practical, and respectful. This lifelong learner was always chasing that big adventure. His experiences and learning prepared him for his exemplary life and public service. “From Peace Corps to a police officer, to chief of police, and then legislator, his life was one of service to his family, friends, community, and the state of South Dakota,” stated Dave Olyer of the RC Club for Boys.