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Dimock's Wegehaupt honored for work with automated cattle feeding

"Cattle are a 24/7/365 type of operation," Wegehaupt said.

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Dimock native Henry Wegehaupt poses for a photo inside the the Zeal Center for Entrepreneurship in Sioux Falls.
Mitchell Republic file photo

DIMOCK, S.D. — Henry Wegehaupt took fourth place in the Governor’s Giant Vision Business competition, it was announced Thursday.

Wegehaupt, of Dimock, was recognized by the South Dakota Chamber of Commerce & Industry for his work with Provender Technologies LLC and modernizing cattle feeding with automated feeding system. He earned a $1,000 prize.

The Mitchell Republic featured Wegehaupt's work in this September 2020 story.

“Cattle are a 24/7/365 type of operation. It would be nice to give (farmers) the freedom and flexibility to spend more time with family and focus on their managerial role,” Wegehaupt said at the time.

The Giant Vision Competition, which is in its 18th year, is a program of the South Dakota Chamber of Commerce and Industry, located in Pierre.

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“The goal of this program is to encourage people to explore being a business owner and to create an exciting future while also expanding South Dakota’s economy," South Dakota Chamber President David Owen said. "We have worked hard to produce an event that will benefit all of the businesses participating. While the prize money will help the finalists, the contacts and rigor required to be a qualifier will prepare each entrepreneur to advance their business idea.”

The winner of the competition was Maryam Amouamouha, of Rapid City, through Amber LLC, with work on Anaerobic Membrane Bioreactor with Electrolytic Regeneration - offers an on-site wastewater reuse system. Amouamouha received a $20,000 prize.

In second place, winning $10,000, was Prairie BioTechnology LLC (Product that can extend shelf life of fruit; a food preservative derived from a proprietary oilseed fermentation process), Matthew Cole, Logan Wolf, Jordan Traub and Ian Schuh, Brookings.

Related Topics: AGRICULTUREBUSINESS
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