SUBSCRIBE NOW Just 99¢ for your first month

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Business

Conservationists have spent years trying to stave off a national decline in hunting and fishing, but the 2020 pandemic appears to have righted a sinking ship.
The North Dakota Soybean Processors plant at Casselton and the Green Bison plant at Spiritwood are signs of the growing demand for renewable fuel as well as feed for the livestock industry.
A North Dakota potato breeder brings in a speaker from Wyoming who has trained a dog to detect potato virus diseases using their nose.
After coming upon a food truck parked directly next to her former Zesto restaurant in downtown Mitchell, Roxie Ackman called on city leaders to restrict the mobile food businesses from parking in city-owned lots.

ADVERTISEMENT

Latest Headlines
The Federal Reserve has become aggressive in their fight against inflation by raising interest rates and accumulating debt rates. Auto loans have yet to catch up with these rising rates, which has led many people to purchase new vehicles before the rates catch up.
Quaal Dairy in Otter Tail County sold off most of its herd in April. Vernon Quaal says the 2021 drought drastically cut into its feed supply and the rising prices for feed made maintaining the 300 cow herd unstainable. Quaal says many dairies are suffering. But he is determined to build back up, with a crop of bred heifers ready to calve in September.
Anne Waltner, Parker, South Dakota, left a full-time career as a concert pianist and educator to join her parents’ farming operation. Along the way she married, had triplet daughters and survived cancer. Of her journey and life, she says: “Can you think of anybody luckier than me?”
The newspaper competes in the highest division against all other daily newspapers. All of the work that was judged was compiled in the 2021 calendar year.
“It’s been a dream of mine to make the store bigger, and Main Street is where I feel we will flourish,” Christie Gunkel said of the 615 N. Main St. building where she will be moving 2nd and Lawler Co to in June.
Cold temperatures and excessive moisture have delayed spring planting across the northern Plains.

ADVERTISEMENT

Wolff's Suffolks has been in the Suffolk industry for over 40 years. But recently, the ranch decided to diversify and sell their lamb to consumers and restaurants.
Two separate projects in the early stages of planning and permitting, hope to be operational in 2024
By using land management practices that protect the soil, producers can improve their profitability, improve their operational resilience and reduce their stress levels.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT