Sections

Weather Forecast

Close
Advertisement
Scientists working to detect a phenomenon known as "neutrino-less double beta decay" work in the clean-room machine shop on the Davis Campus a mile underground at the old Homestake gold mine in Lead. (Katie Adkins/For The Daily Republic)

A taxpayer's guide to the galaxy

Email

LEAD -- Researchers working in the old Homestake gold mine could be on the verge of discovering dark matter, a scientific event that would put South Dakota on the tips of many tongues around the world.

In their quest for such a breakthrough discovery, scientists ride a rough "cage" elevator daily deep below the Black Hills, just as gold miners did for decades.

Get the full story
Subscribe or Log In 

Are you a newspaper subscriber but you don't have a Digital Access account yet? Activate your account.

You will need your subscription account number and phone number. Not sure if you have an account? Email us or call (605) 996-5514 and we can help you.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
randomness