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LETTER: Bring back ethanol’s winning vision in SD

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To the Editor:

The Environmental Protection Agency’s tier three rules reveal some very sobering news for South Dakota’s agricultural economy.

The EPA projects no growth for ethanol production or E30 use through 2030. Clearly, visionary Americans must bring back ethanol’s big, winning vision that goes far beyond basically no growth, small-vision E15 to that of a renewable fuel capable of breaking petroleum’s liquid fuels monopoly.

Historically, no-excuses South Dakota made its big ethanol vision reality. We taxed petroleum one cent per gallon, providing cash incentives to plants that built a small state’s billion-gallon ethanol industry. Today, South Dakota consumers buy E10 up to 30 cents less per gallon than gasoline.

We put the nation’s first nationally recognized FFV on the road (still is), or basically a 1988 Corsica with E85 painted on the doors. We installed the nation’s first blender pumps that are now across the nation.

At blender pump locations, standard auto owners monthly choose popular E30 to travel millions of trouble-free miles. They recognize ethanol’s premium sweet spot, because its lower volatility, higher octane and turbo-charging effect create more power and better fuel efficiencies.

South Dakota can bust the EPA’s and auto manufacturers’ lies protecting petroleum’s 90 percent gasoline monopoly by simply setting a new state precedent of 30 percent market share for ethanol. Their lies claim flex auto parts are different, and using E15 or E30 in a standard auto voids the warranty, even though it never has. The Magnuson-Moss warranty act requires manufacturers prove parts failures, though the same parts were caused by E30’s higher ethanol content: a fraudulent task-check with your dealer.

Importantly, South Dakota will also demonstrate E30 can replace benzene-related octane, nearly eliminating tailpipe emissions identical to secondhand smoke. Most importantly, we can be the only state ever to give the most vulnerable to these emissions, our children, a voice that matters.

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